LawnMasters Lawn and Landscape
Common Lawn and Landscape Weed Pictures
The pictures below are some of the common weeds we see in the average lawn and
landscape. This is not a complete list, just some of the more common ones that we get asked
about. We have listed the type of weed and the control method best to use. Be sure to always
read and follow the label directions when applying chemicals.
Poa annua, or annual meadow grass, is a
widespread low-growing turfgrass in temperate a
solely annual plant due to its name, perennial
bio-types do exist. 'Poa' is Greek for fodder.

It can be controlled with pre-emergent chemicals like
Dimension Herbicide Granules

Or by post emergent spraying with Katana Turf
Herbicide by PBI Gordon
Broadleaf weeds
Broadleaf Plantain Broadleaf plantain is a
shallow mostly fibrous rooted perennial. The leaves
which develop in a rosette are large oval shaped with
predominant veins. Broadleaf plantain is similar to
several other plantain species, but does not have the
purple color at the petiole of the leaves. The main
growth period for broadleaf plantain is from June
through September. The seedhead is described as a
rat-tail like seed head with flowers along the upper half
of the seed head. Broadleaf plantain spreads by both
seed and shoots from the roots. Broadleaf plantain is
found throughout all of the United States.
After this weed is already up and growing
We use this to Control it with Tri-Mec
Buckhorn Plantain - Buckhorn plantain is a
slender fibrous rooted perennial. The leaves develop in
a basal rosette. They are long slender leaves
approximately one-inch across. The leaves have
distinctive parallel venation. The main growth period for
buckhorn plantain is from June through September.
The seedheads are cylindrical spikes found at the tip of
erect, leafless stalks which are 4- to 12-inches long.
The stalks can be hard to cut with mowers. Buckhorn
plantain spreads by seeds and shoots from the roots.
Buckhorn plantain is found throughout the entire
continental United States.
After it's growing,
We use Tri-Mec Classic and Tri-Mec 992 to
control this weed.
Bull Thistle - A variety of thistles are found in turf.
Like most, bull thistle is a biennial. It grows over the
summer months. The leaves are alternate; blades are
simple and form in a rosette. The leaves are unlobed to
pinnately lobed. The blade tip is pointed and the
margins are toothed with spines. The root is a fleshy
taproot the first year and a fibrous root system forms the
second year. The second year of growth, thistle stems
elongate. The elongated stems have alternating leaves.
Flowers are present from June through October on the
elongated stems. The disk flowers are dark pink to
purple with spined bracts. Bull thistle spreads by
seeds. Thistles are found throughout the United States
and Canada.

We control this with Pronto Vegetation killer if
it's out in the open where it can be sprayed without
getting chemical on other plants.

Or, if it's growing in the lawn we use Tri-Mec

More information on this weed from PBI
Gordon
Dandelion - Common in almost all lawns.  
Dandelion is a winter perennial. The dandelion has a
thick fleshy taproot which often branches. New plants
come from the root and root segments. Leaves form in
a rosette, are deeply lobed, with the lobes pointing
toward the base. Both the leaves and flower stems
contain a white milky fluid. The flowers are yellow and
are individual stems. The seeds are brown with the tip
containing white hairs. The yellow flower will turn to a
white globular puffball. The seeds are disseminated by
wind. Dandelions spread by both seed and stems from
the root. Dandelion is found throughout the United
States.
We use this if it's   
growing in the lawn we use
Tri-Mec
For pre-emergence control, use Dimension
Herbicide Granules
Dovefoot geranium - Carolina Geranium is a
biannual plant very similar to the annual Carolina
geranium. Dovefoot geranium has slender, weak hairy
stems which branch and spread across the surface of
the soil. The leaves are palmately lobed. The
alternating rounded leaves of dovefoot geranium are
not as deeply cut as the leaves of Carolina geranium.
Dovefoot geranium spreads by seeds which germinate
in fall into the early spring. Bright dark pink to red violet
flowers are present in late spring. The seeds of
dovefoot geranium are smooth, unlike the wrinkled
seeds of Carolina geranium. Flowers of both plants are
borne on stalks from the upper nodes. The fruit of both
species are born on conspicuous stalks (cranesbill).
The fruit stalk of dovefoot geranium is 1-inch long and
is much smaller than the 1-inch fruit stalk of Carolina
geranium. Dovefoot geranium is found throughout the
United States, but is more prevalent in the southeast.

To control this after it is
growing in the lawn we
use Tri-Mec
Ground ivy is a creeping winter perennial. The
leaves are round to kidney shaped with round toothed
edges. The leaves are opposite on long petiole
attached to square stems that root at the nodes. It is
usually found in moist shaded areas, but also tolerates
sun very well. Ground ivy will form dense mats which
can take over areas of turfgrass. The flowers of ground
ivy are blue to lavender and grow in clusters. It usually
flowers in the spring. The flowers are funnel shaped
and are located at the leaf axis or near the tip of the
stem. Ground ivy spreads by stolons and sometimes
by seed. Ground ivy closely resembles common
mallow. Ground ivy is more common in the East, but
can be found throughout the United States.
To control this after it is
growing in the lawn we
use Tri-Mec
Henbit, a member of the mint family, is an upright
winter annual that blooms in the spring. The leaves are
rounded on the end with rounded toothed edges that
grow opposite one another on square stems Upper
leaves lack petioles. Henbit can grow from 4- to 12-
inches tall on weak stems. Although an upright plant,
weak stems sprouting from the bottom may lay almost
horizontal. Henbit can be confused with purple
deadnettle. The leaves of purple deadnettle, however,
are more pointed at the end and are slightly scalloped.
The lower leaves of purple deadnettle are on long
petioles, the upper leaves are on short petioles. The
flowers of henbit are purple, tubular shaped and form
in the whorls of the upper leaves. Henbit spreads only
by seed and is generally not a problem in dense,
vigorous turfgrass sites.  Henbit is found throughout
the United States. To control this after it is
growing
in the lawn we use Tri-Mec
Horsenettle is an erect perennial weed. The leaves
of horsenettle alternate on stems that contain spines.
Horsenettle leaves range up to seven inches in length
and 1- to 2-inches wide with wavy to coarsely lobed
edges. The veins of the leaves as well as the petioles
contain spines. Horsenettle spreads by rhizomes and
seeds. The flowers of horsenettle are purple to white
in color and occur in clusters on spiny flower-stalks.
The anthers of the flower are yellow. Flowers occur
during the summer. The fruit is smooth globe shaped;
the size of a marble. Fruits are light green in color with
green coloring, but turn yellow at maturity. Horsenettle
is found in pastures, orchards and landscape beds.
Horsenettle will grow in a variety of soil types, but does
best in sand soils. Horsenettle is found in the eastern
United States, west to Kansas and Texas.
To control this after it is growing in the lawn
we use Tri-Mec     For non-selective control
we use
Pronto Vegetation killer
Horseweed is an annual weed, winter or summer,
depending on location. Horseweed is an upright
growing plant and can reach 4 - 5 feet if not mowed.
Horseweed grows in a basal rosette. The leaves
which are oblanceolate in shape are 3- to 4-inches in
length. The leaves alternate and have margins that are
toothed. The stem of horseweed is simple and
unbranched, and covered with hair. Horseweed has a
taproot. The inflorescence is a panicle of heads with
pink to white flowers. Horseweed spreads by seed
produced in the summer. Horseweed is found through
out the United States.

Several products are available to control this after it
has germinated, such as
Speed Zone or

To control this after it is
growing in the lawn we
use Tri-Mec
Mouseear chickweed is a winter perennial. The
leaves are opposite, oblong and covered with hair.
Mouseear chickweed grows prostrate but will have
several upright stems, and can tolerate close mowing.
Mouseear chickweed has a fibrous root system. The
flowers of mouseear chickweed are white and contain
5 petals which are notched at the tip. Mouseear
chickweed spreads by seed, but can root at the nodes.
Mouseear chickweed is found throughout United
States into southern Canada.

This weed, and all of the weeds listed, can be killed  
with this
Non Selective Weed Killer  if they are
growing in an area out of the lawn and away from other
plants that you don't want to harm. This chemical will
kill all plants.
If it's growing in the lawn, we use this chemical that
won't kill grass, but will kill the weed.
Sedges have triangular stems with waxy grass-like
leaves which alternate. Sedges are not grass plants,
but seedlings may be mistaken for grass. The leaves
on both sedges are waxy and have an upright growth
habit and a prominent midrib. Both sedges have
underground root systems containing rhizomes and
underground tubers which accomplish most of the
reproduction. On yellow nutsedge, the tubers (nutlets)
form at the end of whitish rhizomes. Purple nutsedge
forms chains of tubers along brownish rhizomes. The
flowers of yellow nutsedge are yellowish; the seedhead
color of purple nutsedge is red-purple to brown. Both
seedheads are on triangular stems. Both spread
mainly by germinating underground tubers, which are
the only part of the plant that over-winters. A yellow
nutsedge tuber can produce 1,900 plants and 7,000
new tubers in a single growing season. Sedges do
well where soil has poor drainage. Yellow nutsedge is
found throughout the United States; Purple nutsedge is
primarily found in the warm humid southern states.
Sedges are one of the hardest weeds to control in
the lawn and landscape. It usually takes several
applications of
a specific weed control
designed just for sedges. Follow the label
directions closely. It is an expensive chemical, but
it's one of the few that will control Nutsedge.
Yellow woodsorrel, also known as oxalis, is a
summer annual, that can be perennial in some areas.
Yellow woodsorrel grows on weak stems that branch at
the base and may root at the nodes. The leaves form in
groups of three leaflets on long petioles, and are
alternate on the stems. Although sometimes mistaken
for clover when not in flower, the leaves differ from
clover in that they are distinctly heart shaped. The yellow
woodsorrel flower is yellow with five petals and occurs
in clusters. The seed pods range from ½- to 1-inch in
length, have 5 ridges and are pointed. Yellow
woodsorrel spreads by seeds which burst from the
pods at maturity and may be scatted several feet.
Yellow woodsorrel is found throughout the United
States.
To control this after it is growing in the
lawn we use Tri-Mec
Paleseed plantain is a winter annual, sometimes a
biannual. The leaves form in a basal rosette. The leaves
are oblanceolate in shape, usually having smooth
edges, soft hairs and ranging from 2 to 4-inches in
length. Paleseed plantain forms a taproot. Paleseed
plantain spreads from seed that is produced from
flowers present in late spring. The seedhead is formed
in a rat tail shape similar to broadleaf plantain.
Paleseed plantain is found in many parts of North
America.
To control this after it is
growing in the lawn we
use Tri-Mec   For pre-emergent control we
use either Dimension herbicide
Purslane is a summer annual with prostrate growth
from a taproot and fibrous surface roots. The leaves are
thick and waxy, resembling a jade plant. The leaves
usually alternate, with a cluster at the tip of the stem.
Stems are thick, red in color, and branch out from a
central point, forming a mat up to 1-foot in diameter. The
flower is solitary, yellow in color and has 5 petals. The
flower is found in the leaf axis or at the tip of the stem.
Purslane flowers from May to November and spreads by
seeds, which germinate in the spring, or by stem
fragments. Purslane is found through out the United
States, but less in the Pacific Northwest.
Again, we
use Tri-Mec Classic, Tri-Mec 992 or SpeedZone or
a couple other chemicals, some of these you cannot buy
unless you have the required license. Classic you can.
Barnyardgrass is a summer annual which has tillers
that lie flat and form secondary roots resulting in a mat
formation. The leaves of barnyardgrass are rolled in the
bud and contain neither a ligule nor auricles; the sheath
is open but compressed. The mid-vein is thick and
keeled; roots are fibrous. Barnyardgrass spreads by
seeds which germinate in late spring and early summer.
The seedhead is a coarsely branched green to purplish
panicle with spiked awns. Barnyardgrass is found
throughout North America and Mexico.
For Pre-emergent control we use
Dimension herbicide  
Crabgrass is a summer annual that germinates
when soil temperatures reach a consistent 55 degrees
F and is generally killed at the first frost. Crabgrass
leaves are rolled in the bud; the first leaf appears short,
wide and blunt-tipped. The ligule is tall and
membranous with jagged edges, and the auricles are
absent. The collar is broad with long hairs. Crabgrass
is light green in color, coarse bladed and will root at the
nodes when they touch the ground. A single crabgrass
plant can produce up to 700 tillers. It is a bunch type
grass. The inflorescence is a panicle of branches, with
spikelets in two rows. A crabgrass plant can produce
150,000 seeds. Crabgrass needs warm soils and
sunlight to germinate. Crabgrass is found throughout
the United States.
For Pre-emergent control we
use Dimension herbicide   For post
emergent control Katana works good, but it
may take repeat applications.
Spotted spurge is a summer annual. While similar
to prostate spurge, there are several subtle differences
in the two varieties. Spotted spurge has a more erect
growth habit than prostrate spurge. They have similar
leaves, which are small and oblong shaped with an
irregular red to purple spot, but the leaf of spotted
spurge is slightly larger than that of prostrate spurge.
Both spurges will have leaves that grow opposite on the
stem, but spotted spurge has fewer leaves per stem.
Both spurges contain a milky sap in the stem. Prostrate
spurge roots at the nodes, spotted spurge does not.
The flower of spotted spurge is small and green in
color. It germinates in mid spring and flowers from June
to September. Both spotted and prostrate spurge
reproduce from seed, although prostrate spurge also
roots at the nodes. Both spurges are found throughout
the United States.
For Pre-emergent control we use
Dimension herbicide  

To control this after it is growing in the lawn we
use Tri-Mec
Goosegrass is a prostrate-growing summer annual.
The leaves are folded in the bud. Goosegrass grows in
a clump with the base of the leaves being distinctively
white to silver in color. The ligule is toothed,
membranous, and divided at the center. Goosegrass
contains hairs only at the base of the leaf. Goosegrass
seedheads contain 3 -7 spikes that form at the tip of
the seed stalk. The seeds are attached in a zipper
appearance on the spike. Goosegrass spreads by
seeds that germinate later in the season than other
annual grasses. Goosegrass seedheads contain 3 -7
spikes that form at the tip of the seed stalk. The seeds
are attached in a zipper appearance on the spike.
Goosegrass spreads by seeds that germinate later in
the season than other annual grasses. Goosegrass is
found in the United States from the transition zone
south.
For Pre-emergent control we use
Dimension herbicide   For post emergent
control Katana works good, but it may take
repeat applications.
Wild onion, also known as wild garlic (Allium
vineale) is a winter perennial. The leaves are waxy,
upright and needle shaped growing 8- to 12-inches
long. The leaves of wild garlic are hollow and round
and have a strong odor. The leaves of wild onion are
solid and flat and appear directly from the bulb. Both
plants grow from underground bulbs. The
membrane-coated bulbs of wild garlic are flattened on
one side and have bulblets. Wild onion bulbs are white
inside with a strong odor and are covered with a
fibrous, scaly coat. The white to light green flowers of
wild garlic develop on short stems above aerial bulbs.
Wild onion does not have a stem; white to pink flowers
with six elliptical segments. Both wild onion and wild
garlic spread by bulbs, seed and bulblets. Both plants
flower from April through June. Both wild onion and
wild garlic are distributed throughout the United States.
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For weed control for all of these weeds, look
at the text to the right, the highlighted text will
take you to a product that we use for weed
control. We have proven over 26 years that
these products work. Always read the label
that comes with any chemical you use.
For weed control for all of these weeds, look
at the text to the right, the highlighted text will
take you to a product that we use for weed
control. We have proven over 26 years that
these products work. Always read the label
that comes with any chemical you use
For weed control for all of these weeds, look
at the text to the right, the highlighted text will
take you to a product that we use for weed
control. We have proven over 26 years that
these products work. Always read the label
that comes with any chemical you use